Archives for November 2015

November 2015 Newsletter Archive

School-News-Palm-Habor-Private-SchoolElementary Newsletter

VPK

PreSchool

Infant/Toddlers

9 Tips To Get Kids To Listen

ListenDemanding, nagging and yelling will not get your kids to listen. In fact, if your child seems to listen “only when you yell,” chances are that they are obeying out of fear, rather than an internal drive to listen and follow directions.

If you want your kids to listen without yelling or nagging, you need to start with how you communicate your requests to them.

Instead of trying to force your child to listen, focus on yourself first. Change the way you make your requests, and then watch as your child changes their behavior.

USE THESE NINE TIPS TO GET STARTED:
1. Connect: Kids who feel a strong connection to their parents have a stronger desire to respond to their requests. If your child isn’t listening, focus on building the relationship first: play together, read, snuggle, laugh.
2. Limit your commands: Pay attention to how many corrections, requests or redirections you give your child during the day. Chances are, they have tuned you out! Focus on the big things so your child knows what’s important.
3. Whisper: If you have a loud voice or tend to yell your requests, change things up by using a softer tone. Your kids may be caught off guard and focus better. For young kids, whispering a request can be a fun game.
4. Eye contact: Instead of yelling a request from across the room, walk over and be present with your child. Make sure you have their attention before you give the request. Politely interrupt their activity, asking for eye contact, if necessary.
5. Repeat Back: Once you’ve given the request, ask your child to paraphrase what you just said. Even better, ask your child what is expected instead of telling them. For example, ask, “What else do you need to do before you get on the bus?”
6. Be respectful: Nothing shuts down communication like negativity, blaming and finger-pointing. Instead of, “This is the third time I’ve asked you to take out the trash; you’re so lazy!” try, “The trash needs to be out by 5 pm, please. Thanks for your help!”
7. Make it short: Encourage compliance by making your requests simple. “Shoes!” or “Plates in the sink, please.” Most children have difficulty processing a long list of requests. Focus on one or two at a time.
8. Give warnings: No one likes to be interrupted or surprised by a request. Give your child time to obey by giving advanced notice, when possible. Use a timer or something concrete (“at the next commercial”) for small kids.
9. Solve the bigger problem: There may be an underlying reason that your child is not listening. Observe your child and notice when they seem to struggle and when they follow through well.

Common underlying problems and some suggestions are:
1. Process information slowly — speak slowly with long breaks for thinking.
2. Struggle with transitions — give warnings and allow for time between activities.
3. Difficulty processing too many things at once — give one command at a time.
4. Visual learner rather than auditory — use charts, lists, timers and pictures.
5. Unsure what you expect — explain or demonstrate the behavior you’d like to see.
6. Unable to complete the task — teach the skill and practice in advance.

Your child can learn to listen! But, it starts with you. Observe yourself over the next few days. What patterns and habits have you fallen into related to how you talk with your kids? This week, find one thing you’d like to change and pick something from this list to try instead.

(Note: Many parents tell me that they wonder about their child’s hearing. If you’re concerned,
please talk to your doctor. In the meantime, try this test: while your child is in the room, whisper
something about their most desirable activity and see if they respond, for example: “Who want’s to
go get ice cream!” Most of the time, their hearing is suddenly just fine!)

The Benefits of Dramatic Play in Early Childhood Education

Dramatic PlayAn increasing amount of research continues to support play in early childhood development, and there are five primary forms or types of play in which children engage: locomotive, social, object, language and pretend play. Each type of play has its own benefits for the developing mind of a
young child, and while each is important, pretend play (otherwise known as imaginative or dramatic play) is becoming an increasingly popular component in toddler and preschool education.

Dramatic play is defined by experts as a type of play where children assign and accept roles and act them out. For example, child who pretends to feed and rock a doll to sleep is engaging in dramatic play, or a child who pretends to fix a leaky faucet in the play kitchen is engaging in dramatic play.

This is a time for a child to pretend to be someone or something else, and while pretending may just look like “playing”, it is integral to the developmental learning process. There are four primary areas under which children learn and develop through pretend play. They
include:

  • Intellectual – increase in skills such as problem solving, negotiating, creativity, organizing and planning, retelling familiar stories, application of newly gained knowledge, and mathematics
  • Physical – increase in skills such as gross and fin motor development, fitness, strength, and
    coordination
  • Social – development of skills such as sharing, taking turns, cooperation, negotiation, impulse
    control, delay gratification, and deal with disappointment
  • Emotional – increase in self esteem, pride and accomplishment, feeling of safety and protection,
    development of sense of self and individuality, and feelings or purpose

Experts agree that dramatic play is an integral part of a well rounded preschool program as it is
healthy for early childhood development. Through dramatic play, children learn a myriad of skills.
In fact, the Association of Childhood Education International has stated that play is a natural part of
childhood development that cannot be replaced by adult interaction. This means that even adult
instruction cannot replace the valuable experience children gain through play, specifically dramatic
play. So, let the children pretend!
For further reading:
The Vital Role of Play in Early Childhood Education by Joan Almon
The Benefits of Dramatic Play by Ellana S. Yallow, Ph. D.
What is Dramatic Play and How Does it Support Literacy Development in Preschool? by Scholastic.com

November 2015 Newsletter

The November 2015 School newsletter is now availableClick Here

October 2015 Newsletter Archive

School-News-Palm-Habor-Private-School

Elementary Newsletter

VPK

PreSchool

Infant/Toddlers